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READ; The Transfigurations of Jesse Jagz !!!!!

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Jesse Jagz has found his calling, and it is music. Last year, he released the critically acclaimed Jagznation Vol
1: Thy Nation Come. Barely 8 months after, he’s set to release his 3rd studio album: The Royal Niger Company. For this interview, we sit in a crude semicircle in the studio. There’s Jesse Jagz, Hench, Shady Biznis, and Jumar and myself.
From his last album, and all the conversations we’ve had between, it would seem that the rapper/producer not only left Chocolate City, but left the show business of the industry, left the party and the circus and has found something deeper to believe in: music.
 
The studio is his altar. Sacred. A place for profound truth and illumination. His music is his gospel and his weapon.
 
This, this is serious business. This is soul and life and purpose.
 
Music is the religion. And Jesse Jagz, its Holy Prophet.
You’re done with recording and the album drops in less than a week. How do you feel?
I’m tired, yo. I don’t even know how I feel. I’ve worked so hard, so it feels good. 6 months after Thy Nation Come, I’m dropping another project. And next time, the time between will be shorter. *laughs*
We’ve just finished listening to the album back to back. He’s excited about his music, this gospel of his, rapping each verse aloud to be sure you don’t miss a thing. You know that for every maybe 1 million people who say music is life, only one of them will mean it. In this moment that person is Jesse Jagz. For him, music is truly life and alive, and fire in his bones.
Is RNC a compilation of left over songs from Thy Nation Come?
It isn’t. By the time Thy Nation Come was ready for release, I was already recording. A day or two after being done with that, album I was back in the studio expending the remaining energy.
First, it was 2 months of me working alone. Then 2 months with Shady Biznis, Jumar, Hench going over everything I’d done. There are so many who’ve been people involved in this project, from years ago. Shout out to Hench, Oz, James Maverik, people who were part of this.
What was the production process like?
I’ll let my producer answer that.
We turn to his producer Shady Biznis. One of the young talented producers coming up in the game, he’s apparently found a home with Jagznation. He’s been sitting listening attentively.
Shady Biznis: For production, we had Jesse Jagz, Shady Biznis, Jumar, E Kelly, Charlie X, Ibro Pashi… can’t forget him.!! A lot of us. A lot of people worked on this.
Jesse Jagz: Shady is our, he likes being modest, but he is our head producer. I produce, but I have a producer. Whenever I’m done, I take it to him. Sit down and let him work on it. We go through the process everyday.
What was the point of the album; the underlying theme to it?
esse Jagz has found his calling, and it is music. Last year, he released the critically acclaimed Jagznation Vol 
 
1: Thy Nation Come. Barely 8 months after, he’s set to release his 3rd studio album: The Royal Niger Company. For this interview, we sit in a crude semicircle in the studio. There’s Jesse Jagz, Hench, Shady Biznis, and Jumar and myself.
 
From his last album, and all the conversations we’ve had between, it would seem that the rapper/producer not only left Chocolate City, but left the show business of the industry, left the party and the circus and has found something deeper to believe in: music.
 
The studio is his altar. Sacred. A place for profound truth and illumination. His music is his gospel and his weapon.
 
This, this is serious business. This is soul and life and purpose.
 
Music is the religion. And Jesse Jagz, its Holy Prophet.
You’re done with recording and the album drops in less than a week. How do you feel?
I’m tired, yo. I don’t even know how I feel. I’ve worked so hard, so it feels good. 6 months after Thy Nation Come, I’m dropping another project. And next time, the time between will be shorter. *laughs*
We’ve just finished listening to the album back to back. He’s excited about his music, this gospel of his, rapping each verse aloud to be sure you don’t miss a thing. You know that for every maybe 1 million people who say music is life, only one of them will mean it. In this moment that person is Jesse Jagz. For him, music is truly life and alive, and fire in his bones.
Is RNC a compilation of left over songs from Thy Nation Come?
It isn’t. By the time Thy Nation Come was ready for release, I was already recording. A day or two after being done with that, album I was back in the studio expending the remaining energy.
First, it was 2 months of me working alone. Then 2 months with Shady Biznis, Jumar, Hench going over everything I’d done. There are so many who’ve been people involved in this project, from years ago. Shout out to Hench, Oz, James Maverik, people who were part of this.
What was the production process like?
I’ll let my producer answer that.
We turn to his producer Shady Biznis. One of the young talented producers coming up in the game, he’s apparently found a home with Jagznation. He’s been sitting listening attentively.
Shady Biznis: For production, we had Jesse Jagz, Shady Biznis, Jumar, E Kelly, Charlie X, Ibro Pashi… can’t forget him.!! A lot of us. A lot of people worked on this.
Jesse Jagz: Shady is our, he likes being modest, but he is our head producer. I produce, but I have a producer. Whenever I’m done, I take it to him. Sit down and let him work on it. We go through the process everyday.
What was the point of the album; the underlying theme to it?
esse Jagz has found his calling, and it is music. Last year, he released the critically acclaimed Jagznation Vol 
 
1: Thy Nation Come. Barely 8 months after, he’s set to release his 3rd studio album: The Royal Niger Company. For this interview, we sit in a crude semicircle in the studio. There’s Jesse Jagz, Hench, Shady Biznis, and Jumar and myself.
 
From his last album, and all the conversations we’ve had between, it would seem that the rapper/producer not only left Chocolate City, but left the show business of the industry, left the party and the circus and has found something deeper to believe in: music.
 
The studio is his altar. Sacred. A place for profound truth and illumination. His music is his gospel and his weapon.
 
This, this is serious business. This is soul and life and purpose.
 
Music is the religion. And Jesse Jagz, its Holy Prophet.
You’re done with recording and the album drops in less than a week. How do you feel?
I’m tired, yo. I don’t even know how I feel. I’ve worked so hard, so it feels good. 6 months after Thy Nation Come, I’m dropping another project. And next time, the time between will be shorter. *laughs*
We’ve just finished listening to the album back to back. He’s excited about his music, this gospel of his, rapping each verse aloud to be sure you don’t miss a thing. You know that for every maybe 1 million people who say music is life, only one of them will mean it. In this moment that person is Jesse Jagz. For him, music is truly life and alive, and fire in his bones.
Is RNC a compilation of left over songs from Thy Nation Come?
It isn’t. By the time Thy Nation Come was ready for release, I was already recording. A day or two after being done with that, album I was back in the studio expending the remaining energy.
First, it was 2 months of me working alone. Then 2 months with Shady Biznis, Jumar, Hench going over everything I’d done. There are so many who’ve been people involved in this project, from years ago. Shout out to Hench, Oz, James Maverik, people who were part of this.
What was the production process like?
I’ll let my producer answer that.
We turn to his producer Shady Biznis. One of the young talented producers coming up in the game, he’s apparently found a home with Jagznation. He’s been sitting listening attentively.
Shady Biznis: For production, we had Jesse Jagz, Shady Biznis, Jumar, E Kelly, Charlie X, Ibro Pashi… can’t forget him.!! A lot of us. A lot of people worked on this.
Jesse Jagz: Shady is our, he likes being modest, but he is our head producer. I produce, but I have a producer. Whenever I’m done, I take it to him. Sit down and let him work on it. We go through the process everyday.
What was the point of the album; the underlying theme to it?
jesse-jagz-madc-3
The point was I wanted to make music. However, Nigeria is 100 this year,and before then it was known as the Royal Niger Company. A lot of people don’t even know anything about history, Nigerian history. I just wanted to make music, but a lot of the songs have messages. It’s not as preachy as Thy Nation Come, but a
lot of the songs have, if you listen deep, there’s a message.
What was it like going back to J Town to perform?
I haven’t been back to perform in Jos since I left. It was great. Great to be back home where music is really appreciated. *Laughs* I can’t say how good it felt.
He’s smiling as he remembers. He tells the story of how massive the crowd was at the show, surging and pressing against the security. Of seeing a crippled man in front at the show. And to think, he marvels, that that guy left wherever he was, however he did it, got to the venue and paid money to see Jesse Jagz.
What are the plans for the album?
We’re done with it. So. Now we want to talk about promotions. Really we’re just taking our time till everyone knows about it. Also, at the same time, I think its good to promote music but a lot of people give too much attention to promo when there’s no content. If you have content, there’s your promo.
There has to be that balance. There’s too much promo without content. Too much noise.
Our promo is our content. We speak nothing but about our music. Period.
I’m not making music for everybody. I’m not here to tell the whole of Nigeria: “Oh, Jagz is here.”
No. People who know and understand music will find it.
Do you listen to a lot of music when recording?
When I’m recording, no. Before I record, yes. I listen to everything. From Cambodian music, Thailand samples, Madagascar music, Classical, Gospel. I think the only thing I don’t listen to might be Hip hop *laughs*.
And even when recording, you have to take a break, because there’s always that saturation point you get to, where you have to sit back and just chill.

What are the technical aspects of the album, production-wise?

I like this queston. We worked with ProTools, Logic and Cubase. We had about 12 to 13 producers and engineers working. We set up 3 studios, and we were working round the clock. So if I wasn’t voicing, someone else was voicing, or working on an idea. If we were not mixing, someone was working on a beat.
About 60 to 70 percent of the album is live: live, live recording. From scratch. The base, the guitars, the horns and percussions, all live. We used an empty Star bottle as one of our percussions.
It was exciting.
What does this album mean for Jagznation?
I’m not signing anyone but we’re back in the studio working with Jumar, Hench, Dugod and Tesh Carter. That’s my next project. Jagznation is not a record label. I guess we’re just soldiers who have been stripped of everything, so we understand what matters. And we stick out our necks for each other.

 

If there’s one message you wanted people to know and understand, what would it be?
Remember you’re a human being, first. You’re not a Muslim. You’re not a Christian. You’re not Nigerian. You’re not black, you’re notwhite. You are first a human being.You have rights, you deserve everything everybody else deserves.
We need to stop looking at ourselves as “The Africans”. We can make the best music in the world. We can compete. We shouldn’t always show up in the world as the injured African people with our mediocre music and artistes.
If anything I want the younger generation, people with me, and people coming after to know is: we are human beings goddamit!
I mean. No fuel. I have my engineers out trying to find fuel, we can’t buy because they’re not selling to people in Jerricans. People are taking their fuel tanks to buy fuel! There’s no fuel. There’s no light. No good roads. They haven’t fixed one thing.
No jobs. Nothing.
We are an oil producing country! We’re not goats. We’re not flies.
We’re human beings like everybody else and deserve on the world level, and not as African.
And stop living on that pity and poverty and fear.
We are human beings goddamit!
Jesse Jagz gets riled up. We spend a few minutes talking about the situation in the country. The Boko Haram killings, the missing funds, the NIS Recruitment disaster. He has zero tolerance for the people who would suppress and governments that do not hold up their end of the bargain.
And for artistes, know that there’s nothing like Nigerian music. There’s only music in the world. Like: if it doesn’t fly, it doesn’t fly. If people in Japan can’t hear your music and find something to relate to in it, without you having to explain why your music is the way it is, then it’s not good enough.
We are world citizens.
The world is tired of treating us as “Africans”.
I noticed some interesting samples on the album…
The features on the album are samples. I sampled Fela, Tupac, Shaka Khan.
I would never pay any artist in this world, to feature on my song. If you hear it and don’t like it, f#ck off.
These are people I grew up on their music…the movies I sampled, documentaries, that’s the heart of the album. I’ve read like 5 books on Biafra.
People need to check on that. There’s a lot that is the way it is today because of the civil war.
They call it the civil war. It wasn’t civil. It was a freaking genocide. A manslaughter.
Read about it. Find out what has happened to us.
That’s why you’re suffering right now.
Have you got any favourites on the project?
Songs that stand out for me would be Window, Joe Louis, Mama. But everything man…everything. Everything is some part of my life or somebody’s life I’m trying to write about.
This album is a favourite for me.
Shady Biznis: Sunshine. I love Sunshine.
Hench: I like the relationship between RNC and TNC. The way the music has morphed quietly into a new style. RNC has its own vibe. It’s own type of flow. Shows you the work.
Jesse Jagz: Right now we’re working on Jumar’s album. Were listening to it, going over it already beginning work. No time to stop and hail ourselves.
We can’t lay back and bask in this one. Jumar and Shady have been working on this. Should be out later this year.
Considering the Music industry here, what weighs most on your mind?
A lot of people have been working and if there’s anything I’m sending out to my colleagues it’s this: a lot of people have been working. You wake up next year and find you’re a memory.
A lot of the people I came up with: Kahli Abdu, Hench, Oz, have been working from then.
Everybody knows Jesse Jagz, everybody knows MI, everybody knows Ice Prince, but there are a lot of people who have been recording, who have like 5 albums under their belt. And truth is: to someone who puts in a year you’ll ride for 5 years and burn out. To someone who takes ten years to create something: you’re unstoppable. Realize this: they have been putting in work and haven’t even started yet.
Watch out.
Any last words?
Just thanks to everyone who was part of this.
Shout out to SDC. Shout out to Rex. Shout out to Hench, Jumar, Dugod. A lot of people, I had them record over and over again.
And then we just had to end the project.
People must understand, it’s not about what comes out, but the amount of work done that you’ll never hear.
That’s the pain, that’s the soul of the project.
That’s the engine that runs it.
Shout out to everyone. Thanks to everyone.
Especially the ones whose names do not appear on the back of the album.
We’re moving on. That’s one of the reasons why I’m not online, doing false promo.I don’t want to get stuck in my own hype.
I just started. This is just my 3rd project.
There’s so much more music to be done.
RNC? That’s done. Signed sealed delivered. I’m excited about everything next.

 SOURCE : MIABAGA.COM

 

 

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